L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (2024)

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by Dr. Davis | Jul 7, 2021 | Diet and Lifestyle | 55 comments

L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (1)

L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (2)

Making L. reuteri yogurt is really a simple process, but it still trips up some people. Or they don’t understand what we are trying to achieve here, even believing that the benefits we seek can be achieved with conventional yogurt—no, not even close. Or that methods such as prolonged fermentation are unnecessary. So let’s list some of the tripping points to help avoid ending up with a liquid mess that fails to yield all the wonderful benefits of this microbe when restored to your microbiome.

I say “restored” because 96% of people have lost this microbe for a variety of reasons. (Take a look at your bowel flora analysis from Thryve, Viome, or Gut Zoomer, for instance, to see whether you have L. reuteri—you likely do not before consuming the yogurt.) Perhaps your mom lost this microbe and was thereby unable to provide it to you via passage through the birth canal and/or breastfeeding, or perhaps you were delivered by C-section and bottle-fed with little opportunity to obtain it. Or perhaps you took a course—or 5—of antibiotics for ear infections as a kid. Or you have been exposed to glyphosate that, while an herbicide, is also a potent antibiotic that kills off healthy microbial species. There are many reasons that the modern microbiome has been disrupted in the majority, perhaps all of us.

Recall that we ferment for an extended period of time: 36 hours, not the 4 hours of conventional yogurt making. L. reuteri doubles (1 microbe becomes 2, 2 becomes 4, 4 becomes 8, etc.) every 3 hours at 100 degrees F. Fermenting for 36 hours therefore permits 12 doublings, rather than the single doubling permitted by brief conventional fermentation. This is why we obtain greater than 200 billion CFUs (bacterial counts) per 1/2-cup serving. (Our last flow cytometry run yielded a live count of 262 billion.) We also add prebiotic fibers to the fermenting mix to both ensure greater microbial numbers, as well as thicken the end-result.

I have made well over 100 batches without a single failure, so I know that you can do it, too. And, if you join the discussions in our Undoctored Inner Circle website, you can add a number of other interesting fermentation projects that achieve effects such as shrinking your waist, deepening sleep, heightening your immune response, accelerating recovery after strenuous exercise, and reducing arthritis pain.

L. reuteri yogurt-making “Do’s”:

  • Do choose dairy with no added ingredients, i.e., no added gellan gum, xanthan gum, carrageenan, etc. as this will cause too much separation into curds and whey.
  • Do clean your utensils and jars/bowls with hot soapy water to minimize contaminants. Some people even heat their materials, e.g., in the oven, to kill any contaminants.
  • Do begin by making a slurry of a couple tablespoons of yogurt from a prior batch or other source of bacteria (e.g, crushed Gastrus tablets, contents of one Osfortis capsule), a couple tablespoons of half-and-half or other liquid, 1-2 tablespoons prebiotic fiber; mix well. Only then add the remaining half-and-half. This prevents clumping of the prebiotic fiber.
  • Do indeed ferment for 36 hours—no more, no less. The last 3 hours, for example, doubles the number of microbes, e.g., 130 billion becomes 260 billion—a considerable jump. Don’t listen to conventional yogurt makers who confuse what we are doing here with conventional yogurt-making: two very different things. (We are not actually making “yogurt” by the standard FDA definition; we are simply fermenting dairy–but it looks and tastes like yogurt so we call it “yogurt” even though it is much more powerful.) Ferment longer than 36 hours and the rate of microbial death begins to exceed the numbers obtained via doublings (likely due to competition for resources) and you can actually obtain fewer bacteria. Prolonged fermentation also maximally converts the lactose to lactic acid; people with lactose intolerance can typically eat the yogurt without any adverse effect. The drop in pH to 3.5, not the 10-fold less acidic pH of 4.5 of conventional yogurt, means that the casein beta A1 is at least partially denatured, disabling some of its immune-stimulating potential.
  • Do verify the temperature of whatever device you are using to maintain the fermenting temperature, as not all devices are accurate. Also, some devices are pre-set for yogurt making but are set too high; if the device heats to 112 degrees F, for instance, it will kill L. reuteri, since this species dies starting at 109 degrees F or higher. Ideally, choose a fermenting device (yogurt maker, sous vide device, Instant Pot, etc.) that allows you to vary the temperature, as well as the time.
  • Do store your yogurt in the refrigerator where it is generally fine for up to 4 weeks. You can also freeze the yogurt without killing the microbes. (It actually makes a delicious frozen yogurt; here’s a simple recipe for a Chocolate Frozen Yogurt, as shown in the photo above.)
  • Do cover your yogurt lightly during fermentation to minimize fungal contamination, e.g., plastic wrap or a loosely-fitting lid.

L. reuteri yogurt-making “Don’ts”:

  • Don’t pre-heat. If you choose a pasteurized dairy product, there is no need for pre-heating. Conventional yogurt-makers pre-heat because they typically start with a reduced fat milk and pre-heating improves the texture and mouthfeel of the end-result. We start with half-and-half with around 18% milk fat that yields a wonderful texture and mouthfeel—no need to pre-heat.
  • Don’t stir the mixture while it is fermenting, as this increases separation.
  • Don’t use a blender with your yogurt, as this kills the living microbes. While you may still obtain the oxytocin-provoking effect, you lose L. reuteri’s probiotic properties.
  • Don’t put your fermentation setup near an air vent, as the high volume of air will cause fungal contamination.
  • Don’t heat your end-result, i.e., don’t heat on a stove or stir into a hot mixture, as this kills the microbes.

I like to pour off the liquid whey after removing some of the curds, as this reduces whey’s potential to trigger insulin. Even better, filter through a coffee filter or cheesecloth placed into a colander; place the setup into a large bowl or pan and allow the whey to drip out over 4-6 hours, lightly covered. This yields a thicker Greek-style yogurt.

By the way, I’ve written a new book about the intestinal microbiome that goes far beyond any other book before it, packed with prescriptive strategies to achieve all sorts of health effects. Stay tuned. In the meantime, be sure to go wherever you get your podcasts and look for my new podcast, Defiant Health. (Available on Stitcher, Podchaser, Spotify, Amazon Music, iHeart Radio, and Podcast Addict. Waiting for approval on Pandora, Apple Podcasts, and a few others—yes, it’s that new.)

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  1. L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (6)

    Ryan Adams on April 3, 2024 at 11:12 pm

    I’m new to all this. Making my second batch and noticed I have some temperature issues with my yogurt maker. The water temperature is 98° but the yogurt mixture is 112°. Looks like the fermentation is working I.e. the yogurt looks smooth and creamy at 33 hours in. Is the yogurt temperature normally higher than the water temperature or have I created some weird anomaly? Is there a way to know for sure if I’ve made a bad batch?

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    • L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (7)

      Bob Niland on April 4, 2024 at 8:10 am

      Ryan Adams wrote: «…temperature issues with my yogurt maker.»

      What brand & model of device?
      And what was the setting?

      re: «The water temperature is 98° but the yogurt mixture is 112°.»

      How checked?
      Unless the same thermometer was used, sensor inconsistency is a possibility.

      In any case, if accurate, 112°F is too high for reuteri, and is apt to result in suboptimal CFUs.

      re: «Is the yogurt temperature normally higher than the water temperature…»

      No. In my home made incubator rig, the thermostat probe checking the air temp, and the separate digital probe in the yogurt routinely disagree by 1°F or so, but never by more than that after a few hours into the ferment.

      As far as I know, these ferments are not exothermic to any obvious degree.

      re: «Is there a way to know for sure if I’ve made a bad batch?»

      See the ☑☒checklists for some tips.
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    • L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (8)

      SUSAN LEVINE on May 7, 2024 at 4:20 pm

      Hi there, I truly apologize as my reply is not related to your post. I am posting a new question here because I can NEVER figure out how to make my own post! I have been trying for months. But actually, about your question, I am not sure I understand. Are you saying you measured your yogurt temp and it is 112 degrees while the water is only 98 degrees? According to an AI response “When something is heated in water, it will get warmer than the water. This is because heat is the energy that is transferred when fast-moving atoms or molecules hit slower-moving ones and increase their speed. As water is heated, its molecules move faster, which is reflected in a higher thermometer reading.”

      My question is this….Digestive Advantage probiotic recommended for another strain has a TON of ingredients I would NOT want to consume and I want to know if these unwanted ingredients “disappear” in fermentation. Here are the ingredients I would never consume if I had a choice : Maltodextrin, Microcrystalline cellulose, Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, Titanium dioxide, Carrageenan, Potassium chloride, Magnesium stearate, Silicon dioxide, and Chlorophyllin.

      Because of my hesitation I have not yet tried to make the Bacillus Coagulans strain. I would like to know if there are any “more pure” sources for this strain and also for other strains mentioned in the book. I can see that some strains are sold as “pure powders” but of course I do not know if the sources are reliable.
      Thank you very much for your help

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      • L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (9)

        Bob Niland on May 7, 2024 at 9:14 pm

        SUSAN LEVINE wrote: «I am posting a new question here because I can NEVER figure out how to make my own post!»

        On blogs (such as this one), you usually can’t, and must resort to posting a comment on the most suitable thread. Initiating a new topic is a feature of forums, such as the one on ⚖the Inner Circle.

        re: «According to an AI response…»

        That looks like great example of why AI can’t be trusted today. The top reasons for a disparity between a water bath temp and that of something in another container within it might be one or more of:
        🔥 inner pot is over a heating element hot spot
        🔥 recipe is exothermic
        🔥 thermometers disagree
        🔥 inner pot got overheated during cold-start
        These all have simple fixes.

        re: «…Digestive Advantage … Carrageenan»

        Yes, there has apparently been a clueless formulation change. When this came up on the forum earlier this year, Dr.Davis remarked: “makeasmall initial batch, then use that to startthenext.”, to which I might add, freeze what’s left over of that initial batch as ice🧊cubes.

        The maltodextrin will be entirely metabolized by the microbes in the first batch. The rest is mostly just diluted. The carrageenan, being a polysaccharide, may also be metabolized. The concern is that no one apparently knows, including the regulators who approved it.

        re: «…Bacillus Coagulans strain. I would like to know if there are any “more pure” sources for this strain…»

        Not that I recall, and none turned up in a quick search. If you find any candidates, post a comment for product review somewhere on the blog (I see all the traffic).
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  2. L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (10)

    Sandy Scott on December 28, 2023 at 6:11 pm

    I’ve been making ruteri yogurt in my instant pot , I do not preheat half and half but it takes my instant pot 4 hrs to come to 100 degrees, so should I cook longer than 36 hrs?

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  3. L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (18)

    Kathy Waycaster on December 5, 2023 at 1:47 pm

    Unfortunately, I have left my last batch of L.Reuteri yogurt in the refer for approximately three weeks and I want to start making SIBO yogurt but I’m afraid to use this old batch as a starter. I have 8 tablets of the BioGaia left not 10. Do you think I can start a SIBO yogurt using these 8 tablets? I could reduce the half and half by 6.4 oz and only use 26 oz of half and half with the 2 tablespoons of Inulin the one capsule of BioThin and one capsule of Digestive Advantage.
    My concern is that I will be using too much of one of the probiotics and put the final product off balance.
    Or, my other thought is that I could make one batch of L.Reuteri with the 26 oz of half and half, 8 crushed BioGaia tablets, two tablespoons of inulin and then with that finished product, I can make the SIBO with 2 tablespoons of the L.Reuteri and the other two tablets.
    Which do you think would be better? Or, does it matter?
    Thank you for any advice you can give me.
    Kathy

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    • L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (19)

      Bob Niland on December 5, 2023 at 4:38 pm

      Kathy Waycaster wrote: «I have 8 tablets of the BioGaia left not 10. Do you think I can start a SIBO yogurt using these 8 tablets?»

      Perhaps make a cup of L.r.-only yogurt, and freeze it all, as ice cubes, for starter use.

      re: «My concern is that I will be using too much of one of the probiotics and put the final product off balance.»

      That’s a real concern, and part of why Dr.Davis suggests not using the generational method for making the SIBO blend for more than 8-10 cycles.

      Personally, I moot this by making that blend (and others) from ice cubes of the separate yogurts.
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  4. L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (20)

    ELISABETH GREER on December 4, 2023 at 11:29 am

    Please clarify something for me as I cannot find this information. On the podcasts I’ve listened to nor have I been able to find it on your website. you say things like “I take L.reuteri every other day.” Does “taking it” mean eating the “yogurt” or taking tablets? Biogia in tablet form does not benefit you like the yogurt? To get the benefits, you have to eat l.reuteri I. Yogurt and the tablets/capsules are for making yogurt and not ingesting like a vitamin? And if it’s yogurt form only to get the benefits, what are you “taking”every day? A tablespoon? A cup? A pint?

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    • L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (21)

      Bob Niland on December 4, 2023 at 1:59 pm

      ELISABETH GREER wrote: «…you [Dr.D.] say things like “I take L.reuteri every other day.” Does “taking it” mean eating the “yogurt” or taking tablets?…»

      From when this has arisen in video meet-up sessions on the Inner Circle, my general impression that it’s {usually} as yogurt.

      I say {usually} because Dr. Davis travels a fair amount, and taking yogurt is often impractical or impossible. So I wonder if he ever relies on either the 40BCFUs in GuttoGlow™ capsules, one or more 10BCFU capsules of BioGaia® Osfortis®, or even some Cutting Edge Cultures LRSuperfood Starter stirred into something.

      re: «Biogia in tablet form does not benefit you like the yogurt?»

      That raises the questions of: what is the effect sought, how many days does it last, and what is the portion threshold for producing it? If the 40B in@ GtG is no accident, the 10B in a single Osfortis, and the 200M in a single Gastrus® could easily fall short.

      re: «…what are you “taking” every day? Atablespoon? Acup? Apint?»

      I don’t even have useful speculation on that, other than to relate that the program suggestion for any long-ferment yogurt is no more than ½cup per day.
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  5. L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (22)

    ELISABETH GREER on December 4, 2023 at 11:27 am

    Please clarify something for me as I cannot find this information. On the podcasts I’ve listened to, you say things like “I take L.reuteri every other day.” Does “taking it” mean eating the “yogurt” or taking tablets? Biogia in tablet form does not benefit you like the yogurt? To get the benefits, you have to eat l.reuteri I. Yogurt and the tablets/capsules are for making yogurt and not ingesting like a vitamin? And if it’s yogurt form only to get the benefits, what are you “taking”every day? A tablespoon? A cup? A pint?

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  6. L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (23)

    David Leo on November 9, 2023 at 3:21 pm

    Don’t use a blender with your yogurt, as this kills the living microbes. While you may still obtain the oxytocin-provoking effect, you lose L. reuteri’s probiotic properties. – Say what? What scientific basis does blending kill living microbes? Have never heard that before, I could see it if you blend for a long time and heat, possible causing issues, but if its a quick pulse to mix in some fruits etc. Not sure I understand why its an issue?

    Also, it says if you purchase half and half, etc there is no need to heat it, but I see so many people who follow this recipe who do heat it up to 180 for at least 10 minutes, and they say it yields better results?

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    • L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (24)

      Bob Niland on November 9, 2023 at 9:11 pm

      This has been Dr.Davis’ position for some time, and as he has been working with bacterial recipes and microbiologists for some years now, on various projects, I’m inclined to take him at his word on it.

      It appears that the main risk is maceration. Asecondary risk is heating. The stouter blenders can turn cold ingredients into hot soup. The local heating at the blade edges must be impressive for that to happen.

      re: «…but if its a quick pulse…»

      You’ll need to rely on your own eyeballed food science there. There is surely some threshold below which it’s not a problem, but precise instructions would have too many variables.

      re: «…I see so many people who follow this recipe who do heat it up to 180 for at least 10 minutes, and they say it yields better results?»

      It’s an optional step (except for raw dairy, where it’s not optional). Ido for several reasons: habit from when we had goats, because my incubator can’t cold-start, and to sterilize the pot, whisk, inulin & thermometer. It may also modify the dairy proteins a bit, and incorporate the inulin more consistently, but in any case, my results are quite reliable.
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  7. L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (25)

    Jose Rosas on October 22, 2023 at 7:34 am

    If I fermented it to 37 hours on accident is it still good or just a wasted batch???

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    • L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (26)

      Bob Niland on October 22, 2023 at 10:24 am

      Jose Rosas wrote: «If I fermented it to 37 hours on accident is it still good or just a wasted batch???»

      See ⏰reply here.
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  8. L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (27)

    Kathy Waycaster on July 30, 2023 at 12:46 pm

    My yogurt maker is quite large. Can I double the batch, using 2 quarts half and half, 4 TBSP of previous yogurt and 4 TSP of Inulin?

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    • L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (28)

      Bob Niland on July 30, 2023 at 6:46 pm

      Kathy Waycaster wrote: «My yogurt maker is quite large. Can I double the batch, using 2 quarts half and half, 4 TBSP of previous yogurt and 4 TSP of Inulin?»

      Yes. The recipes scale linearly, up and down. Use same temp & time, of course.

      I would not up-scale a first batch from retail probiotics, but second and later, no problem.
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      • L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (29)

        Kathy Waycaster on August 1, 2023 at 4:43 pm

        Bob thank you for the reply on doubling the batch. I have one more question, Is it possible to use Whole Ultra Pasteurized milk that comes in a carton and not refrigerated. Here in Mexico it’s sold in a box on a shelf not in the refrigerator section. That seems to be the only ultra pasteurized milk I can find without additives. I have made three batches now with fresh half and half with the emulsifiers and stablizers and they have all separated into whey and curds. So I’m not sure I’m getting the L.reuteri which is the point of making this yogurt. Any information you can pass along would be appreciated. Thank you.

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        • L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (30)

          Bob Niland on August 1, 2023 at 6:42 pm

          Kathy Waycaster wrote: «Is it possible to use Whole Ultra Pasteurized milk that comes in a carton and not refrigerated. Here in Mexico it’s sold in a box on a shelf not in the refrigerator section. That seems to be the only ultra pasteurized milk I can find without additives. »

          I would expect UHT dairy to be suitable for use, with two caveats, one you’ve already mentioned: it needs to be only milk (or cream). The other consideration is that milk seems more likely separate than half&half, or H&H made by combining milk & cream.

          re: «I have made three batches now with fresh half and half with the emulsifiers and stablizers and they have all separated into whey and curds.»

          Those ingredients are probably at least interfering with microbial feeding, if not acting a preservative perse.

          If you can get raw milk, just pasteurize it yourself.

          re: « So I’m not sure I’m getting the L.reuteri which is the point of making this yogurt.»

          If you’re confident that the Gastrus® bugs are alive, keep trying. Otherwise, you may need to wait for cooler weather to confidently order some new probiotic.
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          • L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (31)

            Kathy Waycaster on August 15, 2023 at 12:36 pm

            Bob, I think I have it figured out. I took whole milk that was pasteurized with no additives. Heated it to 180 degrees F for 20 minutes, then cooled in the refer over night. I mixed 4 tablespoons of Inulin with 4 Tablespoons of the cooled milk and 4 tablespoons of my last batch of L. Reuteri. When it was smooth I mixed in the remaining 1.5 ltrs of cooled milk. I put it in my yogurt maker at 100 degrees F for 36 hours. It’s perfect. No separation and quite thick and delicious. So hopefully that should work for me. Thanks for all your help. Kathy

  9. L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (32)

    Nasser Siddiqui on August 29, 2022 at 10:28 am

    Does anyone know of the side effects with such a high amount of L. reuteri CFU in the yogurt ? 1/2-cup serving size has more then 1000 times more CFU then what BioGaia recommends.

    Companies like BioGaia will perform clinical trials to make sure the CFU they are recommending are safe and does not cause any side effects down the line ( say 10 or 15 years later)

    Ocetosin tends to naturally slow down as you grow old and I am sure there is some reason for this, after all the human body is build smart but boosting this with reuteri as you age, will it cause any damage to organs.

    If there are already discussion on this topic please share Dr Davis views

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    • L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (33)

      Bob Niland on August 29, 2022 at 5:18 pm

      Nasser Siddiqui wrote: «Does anyone know of the side effects with such a high amount of L. reuteri CFU in the yogurt?»

      You might be the first person to ask on any of the blogs, or in the subscription forum. Idon’t recall seeing any adverse reactions raised, other than perhaps the occasional person not being happy with specific dream content where vivid dreams have been restored. Dr.Davis has suggested that consumption in late stage pregnancy might not be wise. I’ve personally been making one or another of the program progurts for years now, and nothing has raised an eyebrow.

      re: «1/2-cup serving size has more then 1000 times more CFU then what BioGaia recommends.»

      Keep in mind that the point of the recipes is the CFUs, and not yogurt perse. If the product you have in mind is Gastrus®, note that BioGaia® also says of their product “Excessive consumption may have a laxative effect due to the content of sweetener in the product.”. The non-microbial ingredients in the tablets are irrelevant after the first batch of yogurt. Biogaia may also only have tested doses to clinical effect for a specific benefit (that might not include oxytocin provocation, bacteriocins, etc). If they tested in rodents to determine Tolerable Upper Limit (of just the CFUs), I’ve not seen that data.

      Biogaia also has the usual merchandising tension of needing to recover investment and have an on-going business model. If it were possible for them to make a take-once preparation, their shareholders would freak out if they did.

      re: «Companies like BioGaia will perform clinical trials to make sure the CFU they are recommending are safe and does not cause any side effects down the line ( say 10 or 15 years later)»

      Well, they can’t know that for humans, because the product hasn’t been around that long. They may or may not have performed lifetime outcome studies in their rodent models. Dr.Davis keeps an eye on the matter, for example: Have We Discovered the Fountain of Youth?

      re: «Ocetosin tends to naturally slow down as you grow old and I am sure there is some reason for this, after all the human body is build smart but boosting this with reuteri as you age, will it cause any damage to organs.»

      In the modern settler populations, there are various reasons for oxytocin decline, and the majority are non-ancestral. But even on a pessimistic evolutionary view, MotherNature™ doesn’t much care about us one way or the other once we reach about twice reproductive age. So if any of the damaging don’t-cares can be beaten back by simple steps, you can either choose to address them, or brighten some Malthusian’s day.
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    • L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (34)

      Tracey Baca on September 29, 2022 at 4:30 pm

      What should I look out for that implies failure? I’m concerned that my L. Reuteri coconut batch temp was around 90 at times and up to 110 at other times. Also, what does contamination look or smell like?

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      • L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (35)

        Bob Niland on September 29, 2022 at 5:49 pm

        Tracey Baca wrote: «What should I look out for that implies failure?»

        Here are some general tips.

        re: «I’m concerned that my L. Reuteri coconut batch temp was around 90 at times and up to 110 at other times.»

        The low temp just slows growth (but invites contamination). That 110°F might have caused some die-off. Iget nervous if the temps gets out of an approximate 96-106°F range.

        re: «Also, what does contamination look or smell like?»

        Pink or orange spots. Black spots, and of course obvious mold growth. Smell I can’t guess about.
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  10. L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (36)

    Daniel Sherman on July 17, 2022 at 7:42 pm

    Had very good luck making my first batch with an Instant Pot — Used 2 quarts of grassfed organic milk, a couple of teaspoons of inulin, and about 10 L.R. tablets crushed up. Did heat the milk firs.t and then used yogurt setting at “normal” temperature, which tests at about 105 degrees Would it hurt to go to “low,” which seems to be about 95 degrees?

    I needed to stop yogurt after 30 hours (needed to leave house unexpectedly for rest of day) but everything looked good – poured off about 2 cups of liquid, which left behind yogurt that was soft but pretty much in one piece.

    It was quite tasty – not too tangy – I’ll saved some yogurt and whey in a covered glass container and will use this mix as a starter.

    Enjoyed Dr. Davis’s book on the gut health and am happy to mix this yogurt into my diet.

    FYI I am 64 yo male in what I think is god health – want to stay that way.

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    • L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (37)

      Bob Niland on July 20, 2022 at 11:16 am

      Daniel Sherman wrote: «Did heat the milk firs.t…»

      To what temperature and for how long? And what was the temp when the L.r. was added?

      re: «…then used yogurt setting at “normal” temperature, which tests at about 105 degrees Would it hurt to go to “low,” which seems to be about 95 degrees?»

      Have you verified either of those temps by using a water-only ‘batch”? If so, I’d be inclined to use the 105°F setting, rather than the 95, to discourage unwanted microbes.

      re: «I needed to stop yogurt after 30 hours…»

      If I found myself in that situation, I’d tend to run long. Iused to routinely run my L.r. batches to 48h, and accidentally to 54h, so the recipe is tolerant of over-time.

      re: «I’ll saved some yogurt and whey in a covered glass container and will use this mix as a starter.»

      It can be saved indefinitely for starter use by freezing, and ice-cube form might be ideal, as one cube starts one quart.
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      • L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (38)

        Daniel Sherman on July 28, 2022 at 8:24 am

        Did test Instant pot temps with water bath with reliable thermometer.

        Did the initial hearing to 180 and then waited until milk settled at 105.

        Had very good experience with second batch using few tablespoons from first batch, inulin, and 3 crushed LR tablets – yogurt came out very firm with good taste.

        Looks like instant pot (small one at 3 quarts) works well here.

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        • L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (39)

          Bob Niland on July 28, 2022 at 11:21 am

          Daniel Sherman wrote: «Had very good experience with second batch using few tablespoons from first batch, inulin, and 3 crushed LR tablets…»

          Although I experimented with re-inoculation years ago, I no longer recommend it. If the process needs more bugs, you need to start over. And the tabs add a trivial number of CFUs compared to what’s in even a tbsp of a prior batch of progurt.

          So adding more tabs is a waste of money, and definitely won’t fix any instances of contamination by unwanted species.
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  11. L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (40)

    Whitney Benefield on July 13, 2022 at 8:50 am

    I am having trouble getting my “yogurt” to be the right consistency. I purchased a starter culture from Cultured Food Life by Cutting Edge Cultures after hearing Dr. Davis on Donna Schwenk’s podcast. I used that culture with 2 tablespoons potato starch and a quart of half & half in a yogurt maker set to 100 degrees for 36 hours for my first batch. It completely separated into curds & whey. I’ve made 3 subsequent batches; the first subsequent batch I used 2 tbs of the whey to culture, the next I again tried 2 tbs, the last I used 1 tbs. They have all completely separated into curds & whey. Do you have any suggestions? What am I doing wrong? Any insight would be greatly appreciated!

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    • L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (41)

      Bob Niland on July 13, 2022 at 1:48 pm

      Whitney Benefield wrote: «I am having trouble getting my “yogurt” to be the right consistency.»

      What recipe?

      re: «…starter culture from Cultured Food Life by Cutting Edge Cultures…»

      What culture?
      The CEC Yogurt Plus starter?

      If so, the recipe you are using (which is for Biogaia® Gastrus® L.reuteri strains alone), is not the same as the basic recipe that CEC has on their page: nostarch, 100°F-110°F, 6-8hours. The CEC recipe is going to make a yogurt, and not a progurt, so to speak. Whether or not their cultures can be used in a 36h ferment is not something I’d have any guesses about.
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      • L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (42)

        Whitney Benefield on July 14, 2022 at 10:33 am

        Bob, Thanks for replying so quickly. I used the CEC LR Superfood Starter which can be found here: https://cuttingedgecultures.com/lr-superfood/ The recipe I used is included with the culture, but is the same recipe that Dr. Davis uses. Maybe I just need to regroup and purchase the tablets. I had not heard of Dr. Davis before I found him through Donna’s podcast. So I guess I’m coming at this from a different direction! I have since read the Wheat Belly book and started that journey and am starting the Super Gut book now.

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        • L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (43)

          Bob Niland on July 14, 2022 at 12:59 pm

          Whitney Benefield wrote: «I used the CEC LR Superfood Starter…»

          Ah, thanks; Lactobacillus reuteri {possibly ATCC} SD-5865, CFUs per portion not so far discovered — Ihave never tried that myself, and don’t recall seeing any discussions by people who have tried it in a 36h recipe, so I don’t know what to predict in terms of either resulting consistency or physiologic effects.

          The lack of CFU info in particular doesn’t allow me to even guess on the likelihood of ‘first batch syndrome’.

          re: «I have since read the Wheat Belly book…»

          Was that the original 2011 book, or the 2019 Revised & Expanded?
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          • L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (44)

            Whitney Benefield on July 14, 2022 at 3:39 pm

            It was the 2019 Revised & Expanded. I thought I’d start there and work my way up :) I think I’m going to get the Biogaia® Gastrus® and try that. I’ve made too much curds & whey for my liking.

  12. L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (45)

    Lisa Killingsworth on July 5, 2022 at 1:26 pm

    I rotate making 1 qt. Bacillus coagulans and 1 qt. Lactobacillus reuteri from the whey strained from each previous batch. Things have been going very well and I appreciate all I have learned so far! I’d like to know if it is OK to combine the two yogurts in the same container for refrigeration?

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    • L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (46)

      Bob Niland on July 5, 2022 at 5:56 pm

      Lisa Killingsworth wrote: «I’d like to know if it is OK to combine the two yogurts in the same container for refrigeration?»

      For consumption, in general, yes.

      ‘For consumption’: implying that you wouldn’t use arbitrary blends as starter for future batches, for a number of reasons.

      ‘In general’: because some of the strains being explored in the program express more bacteriocins than others, and might suppress the benefits of the other strain(s) present.

      As it happens, Coagulans & Reuteri do coexist in the SIBO yogurt blend, for which a bargain temperature has been worked out, and relative population drift over a very few generations is not thought to be an issue. So mixing those two, particularly post-ferment, is not likely a problem.
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  13. L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (47)

    Therese Sanders on April 10, 2022 at 9:32 am

    I’m vegan so no dairy. I’ve tried making this x2 with no success.
    First time:
    Organic cane sugar
    Inulin
    2 can coconut milk
    BioGastrus tablets crushed
    Ferment 36 hours
    Pure liquid, awful smell, afraid to taste

    2nd time

    2 cans coconut cream
    1can coconut milk
    Inulin
    Organic cane sugar
    BioGastrus tablets
    Ferment 30 hours

    Pure liquid, very little smell, and sweet
    Any thoughts or comments appreciated. Thank you.

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    • L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (48)

      Bob Niland on April 10, 2022 at 12:03 pm

      Therese Sanders wrote: «…so no dairy.»

      There are several reasons why anyone might be avoiding dairy, which is why the coconut milk versions of the recipes have been in development. The Inner Circle site recipe has changed several times, and is presently using a common coconut milk base with [non-hydrolyzed] guargum and specific preparation (requiring a stick blender).

      This hasn’t been posted to the Blog that I recall. Here’s an earlier variation:
      2019-09-06: Making L. reuteri yogurt with coconut milk — that is no longer the current recommendation — and which illuminates the challenge of posting developmental recipes to the blog, as the older articles don’t get updated. (and I haven’t personally tried making non-dairy yogurt in several years now)

      I’m not sure what Dr. Davis might have planned for a blog update on non-dairy yogurts. While I wander off and make inquiries on that, let me get more insight on the context…

      re: «I’m vegan…»

      The possible benefits of these exploratory yogurts rest on a foundation of the core program, which is challenging to do on a vegan diet. For anyone needing to assess their status, the lab markers which there are specific program targets are found here.
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    • L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (49)

      Danielle Rigney on April 10, 2022 at 1:10 pm

      In Dr. Davis recipe there are three ingredients, prebiotic fiber starter tabs or 2 tablespoons of yogurt whey from previous batch in a quart of half-and-half or coconut milk. It did not say in the recipe to add sugar. I think that is your problem …why don’t you try making it again with a quart of coconut milk without sugar you can always add sweet drops once fermentation is done.

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      • L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (50)

        Bob Niland on April 10, 2022 at 2:14 pm

        Danielle Rigney wrote: «…why don’t you try making it again with a quart of coconut milk without sugar you can always add sweet drops once fermentation is done.»

        One of the challenges with coconut milk/cream-based recipes is that these dairy substitutes don’t contain enough simple carbohydrate for the bacteria to metabolize to the desired degree. So the coconut recipes in development have lately been adding actual sucrose (table sugar; glucose+fructose).

        It’s not to sweeten the product, as the sugar is expected to be gone at the conclusion of the fermentation. Indeed, it’s mostly turned into short-chain fatty acids, which confer a tangy taste, and not a sweet one.

        Starting from tablets also has the challenge that it’s actually not all that many CFUs. Batches started with saved yogurt get a much firmer head start, so to speak.
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  14. L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (51)

    Danielle Rigney on March 28, 2022 at 8:42 pm

    When is the ideal time to separate the whey from the curds?
    While it is still warm or can it be done anytime.
    Do you need to separate with a cheese cloth or coffee filter?
    Can I just pour it out?
    Is it a preference?

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    • L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (52)

      Bob Niland on March 29, 2022 at 8:31 am

      Danielle Rigney wrote: «When is the ideal time to separate the whey from the curds?
      While it is still warm or can it be done anytime.
      »

      Most people do it right away, while the batch is still warm.

      re: «Do you need to separate with a cheese cloth or coffee filter?»

      Cheese cloth is generally preferred. A coffee filter is apt to take way too long (or even clog & stop). A typical not-too-fine mesh strainer might also suffice.

      re: «Can I just pour it out?»

      Yep. My production batches don’t have enough to bother with. Initial batches do, but in my routine, most of such a batch ends up in ice cube trays for use as future starter. If making the yogurt in a larger pot, using a perforated spoon or scoop to transfer it to the storage containers might suffice.

      re: «Is it a preference?»

      Yes & no. For someone with a known whey sensitivity, or having encountered a weight loss stall, reducing whey intake is worthwhile
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  15. L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (53)

    Valiegirl on December 15, 2021 at 5:42 pm

    Hello! My sister and I have been making reuteri yougurt for a month now, eating a little more than half a cup a day. We haven’t experienced any of the benefits, especially more love, patience and empathy for our fellow man (the one we needed most!).
    We bought a sous vide unit for precise temperature, ferment for 36 hours, started with gastrus tablets, then used some yogurt from current batch for next batch, use the inulin you recommended and half and half with no other ingredients. I whisk slowly to make a slurry before adding the rest of the liquid.
    I follow the directions explicitly and get a yogurt (not one that stands up like butter as doc talks about), but how do we know it is reuteri yogurt? Why aren’t we seeing any of the benefits?
    Thanks so much for your insight,
    Val

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    • L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (54)

      Bob Niland on December 16, 2021 at 10:03 am

      Valiegirl wrote: «I follow the directions explicitly and get a yogurt (not one that stands up like butter as doc talks about), but how do we know it is reuteri yogurt?»

      See if there are any clues in my checklists.

      As you can see from that article, my personal process varies a bit. The resulting product has a consistency somewhere between whipped cream and whipped butter.
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  16. L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (55)

    Kirkinportland on September 24, 2021 at 2:30 pm

    My yogurt at 24 hrs is usually quite firm so I stop….. Will the bacteria continue to multiply and have food to eat if I go to 36 hours?

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    • L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (56)

      Bob Niland on September 24, 2021 at 3:41 pm

      Kirkinportland wrote: «My yogurt at 24 hrs is usually quite firm so I stop….. Will the bacteria continue to multiply and have food to eat if I go to 36 hours?»

      Answered where asked earlier.
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  17. L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (57)

    Rebecca Kennedy on September 18, 2021 at 5:22 am

    I vaguely recall Dr Davis addressing breast cancer & the yogurt. Can someone clarify if the yogurt is recommended for a BC survivor?

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  18. L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (59)

    mrojas_76 on July 17, 2021 at 11:55 pm

    Can I use only cream or has to be half and half? Once the process finishes,, how much yogurt did you end up with? Because I used a quart of half and half and ended up with about 1.5 cups og greek style yogurt.
    Also my yogurt device is a crockpot express brand and only says low or high for temperature, it doesn’t say how many F it uses :(

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    • L reuteri Yogurt: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. William Davis (60)

      Bob Niland on July 18, 2021 at 1:08 pm

      mrojas_76 wrote: «Can I use only cream or has to be half and half?»

      It appears that the lactose is lower in heavy cream vs. H&H or full-fat milk. Check the container Nutrition Facts. If I wanted to try using cream only, I’d be tempted, as needed, to add some unmodified potato starch to make the net carbs equivalent to H&H. But frankly, when I can’t find suitable H&H, Ijust use half cream + half milk.

      re: «Once the process finishes,, how much yogurt did you end up with?»

      Well, with my current process (using 2 thawed ice cube’s worth of saved frozen yogurt or whey, per quart, as starter), I’m getting almost zero whey to drain off. My impression is that volume of the resulting product is slightly higher than the starting amount + starter, as there’s usually more than I expect in the brew pot after filling the final storage jars.

      re: «Also my yogurt device is a crockpot express brand and only says low or high for temperature, it doesn’t say how many F it uses :(»

      Run it for a while with just water, and a probe thermometer. It’s really worth knowing how it behaves. We ended up abandoning the not-so-smart-pot we originally bought for making yogurt, because the “ygrt” temp was too high, too unstable, and had hot spots near the heating elements (which is a real problem in cold-start).
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